canoes and kayaks on river helping disabled young people enjoy paddlesportsDisability

Basingstoke and Deane Canoe Club

We fund hoist to help young disabled young people get in and out of canoes and kayaks.

Basingstoke and Deane Canoe Club, based on the Basingstoke Canal, provides safe paddlesport activities for disabled young people. Paddlesport activities include recreational kayaking and canoeing.

The Axis Foundation’s donation of £2,000 helps buy them a mobile mechanical hoist. This will help paddlers with physical disabilities (in particular wheelchair users) to get on to the water. They can then take part in kayaking and canoeing activities on the canal.

“We are passionate about being able to provide kayaking and canoeing activities to people who would not otherwise be able to participate in paddlesports. The hoist will assist getting paddlers with impaired mobility in and out of kayaks and canoes” – Janella Mansell, Paddlesport Officer

The hoist will help young disabled people from Trealors College, a local school and college for disabled young people. Students currently have to use a swimming pool because of the height of the banks at the club house, Odiham Wharf, Colt Hill in Odiham, Hampshire.

The benefits of paddlesports include independence and better physical and mental wellbeing.

More about Basingstoke and Deane Canoe Club

Basingstoke and Deane Canoe Club is a charity run by volunteers.  The Club is affiliated to British Canoeing. Their specialist coaches are trained and experienced in kayaking with disabled people. They run courses throughout the year, regular taster sessions over the summer and have regular club nights. And, they reach out to their local community offering bespoke taster sessions to youth groups and other voluntary organisations.

More here http://www.badpaddlers@org

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helping children with autism, child with headphones in front of screenDisability

Time4Autism

Axis Foundation’s donation helps children with autism improve their motor and cognitive abilities.

Time4Autism is run by parents and volunteers to provide activities for children with autism. These activities, which include yoga, drumming and trampoline, help children develop their motor and cognitive abilities.

The Axis Foundation’s donation of £600 buys a Soundsory headset. This is a multi-sensory programme of music (processed with neuro-acoustic modifications) and movement-based exercises, designed to help children with autism improve their motor and cognitive abilities.

Time4Autism will lend the Soundsory system to families within their local community in Milton Keynes so they can help their children at home. This is especially vital when face to face sessions are impossible due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Thank you for the generous gift to Time4Autism! We are so happy to have your support. Through your donation, we can continue working towards supporting children with Autism. Your donation is going toward providing headsets for children with sound sensitivities and sensory problems. You have helped us to lend the system to families, so they can help their children at home. This is especially vital when face-to-face sessions are impossible due to COVID-19 restrictions. Thank you again!” – Jabeen Salam, Treasurer

More about Time4Autism

The charity helps parents and carers to understand their child’s sensory needs and behaviours and supports them in dealing with challenging behaviours.

The Soundsory programme which we have donated also helps children and adults with motor delays, balance and coordination issues, sensory and auditory processing disorders, ADD and ADHD as well as whose on the autism spectrum and with developmental issues.

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Group of children learning to develop key communication and motor skills at SkylarksDisability

Skylarks

Our donation helps disadvantaged children with disability gain vital communication and motor skills.

Skylarks provides a supportive and active community for children with disabilities and additional needs. The charity offers inclusive play sessions, therapies and workshops and structured activities. These include Sensory Art, Singing with Percussion, Makaton Sing and Signing. All these activities help the development of key communication, motor and sensory skills.

The Axis Foundation’s donation of £1,500 buys sensory equipment and toys to support these structured activities.

“We are delighted to receive a donation from the Axis Foundation. It has enabled us to purchase new equipment for our interactive Sensory Room. The donation has funded new weighted soft furnishings and a range of audio visual equipment including fibre optic lights, colour changing light panels and more. The room creates a relaxing area for the children to use whilst allowing them to enjoy new experiences and develop communication, motor and sensory skills.

“With the support of organisations like the Axis Foundation, Skylarks can continue supporting disadvantaged children and their families for years to come.

“We really appreciate the funding Axis has provided to purchase this equipment. Skylarks closed for the last 6 months due to Covid-19. However we plan to partially re-open soon so more families can use the equipment you have enabled us to purchase” – Aaron Guiver, Development Manager at Skylarks

More about Skylarks

Whilst supporting disadvantaged children with disabilities, Skylarks, based in Twickenham in south west London, also cares for the whole family. The play sessions at Skylarks offer a safe and relaxing haven for the families in a non-judgemental environment. And while children are accessing therapies and supervised play, parents can access a wide range of peer support, relaxation therapies and informative workshops by specialists such as speech and language therapists and the National Autistic Society.

Over the last three years Skylarks has increased its membership from 550 to over 2,000 children.

Read more here 

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Young girl in blue shirt riding brown pony Barrow Farm helping adults and children with disabilitiesDisability

Barrow Farm

Our donation brings new pony Milly to Barrow Farm which offers riding for adults and children with disabilities.

Barrow Farm offers subsidised riding, including to those with limited means, bringing fitness, fulfilment, friendship and fun to adults and children with disabilities.

The Axis Foundation’s donation of £5,500 went towards purchasing a new pony, Milly, who can offer riding and driving experiences to at least five more people every week.

Dr Karen Lehner, Vice Chairman of the Trustees, said: “We are truly indebted to the Axis Foundation enabling us to help more disabled children and adults. Milly has settled in well and has already started her work with  our disabled riders.

“We are very pleased to have a few riders back now [the centre closed during COVID-19 lockdown]. It’s such a pleasure to see the smiles on their faces as they return to meet their beloved favourite pony.”

One mother said after her daughter’s first visit back:

 “Thank you for today ‘A’ so enjoyed being back at Barrow Farm.  She was so keen and relaxed to go and be with you all.  Your organisation of the session is brilliant and made me relax  – I was nervous myself having not been out in the world but I enjoyed the session as much as ‘A’ did!!! ‘ A’ very chatty about her session on the way home and been telling dad all about it.  Many thanks to you, Sally and Claire for doing this. Obviously my next question is can we please have another session when it’s available?”

More about Barrow Farm

Every week 130 riders and 11 carriage drivers with a range of difficulties enjoy the riding at this specialist centre in Essex where 13 horses and ponies, along with four paid coaches and over 80 volunteers offer support in a safe environment.

The father of one driver described his daughter’s riding session as  “the highlight of her week” while his daughter added “ I am constantly striving to improve. It’s something new that I haven’t done before; I learn something new every time. Having a hobby outside of my work life distracts me from work and helps with stress.”

Barrow Farm loves welcoming new visitors  – find out more here.

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Patient using an FES machine in therapyDisability

Berkshire MS Therapy Centre

Axis Foundation donates a Functional Electrical Stimulation machine to the Berkshire MS Therapy Centre.

The Berkshire MS Therapy Centre has supported people with Multiple Sclerosis for over 30 years. Our donation means that the centre can buy a four-channel Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) machine, and the accompanying electrodes. The machine stimulates four muscles simultaneously, alleviating symptoms such as impaired limb movement and muscle weakness.

I feel like I did before I had MS – Candice, patient

Being able to exercise properly is vital for MS sufferers because exercise rebuilds muscle strength. It also benefits fatigue and balance, decreasing the risk of falls. Candice, who uses the machine said: “It is amazing how this small piece of equipment can make me grin like a love-struck teenager! I just can’t explain enough how it feels to suddenly have so much improvement in my movements. I feel like I did before I had MS. A simple thank you just doesn’t seem enough to convey what a difference this has made.”

The Berkshire Centre has used FES therapy for years but usually this therapy is a treatment for foot drop. The centre now uses a four-channel machine to aid people with wider movement issues, helping even more MS sufferers. FES applies electrical charges to muscles that have been paralysed or weakened because of brain or spinal cord damage. Leading physiotherapist Henriette said the machine “is a great addition because we can offer more support for people with MS”.

She adds: “On behalf of everyone at the Berkshire MS Therapy Centre thank for your help and generosity.”

MS is an unpredictable condition that affects hundreds of thousands of people across the UK. It can cause a range of debilitating symptoms; the centre uses treatments to make life with MS easier. To find out more, visit https://www.bmstc.org/.

Watch Candice with an FES machine in action below.

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Two young girls stood next to plane at bader braves young aviator dayDisability

The Douglas Bader Foundation

Axis Foundation donation keeps children flying at Bader Braves Young Aviator days.

For 35 years, the Douglas Bader Foundation has supported people with limb-loss and disabilities. Their Bader Braves Young Aviator Days offer disabled children the chance to fly in a light aircraft. Our pledge of £3000 means that at least 40 more children will take to the skies next year.

All children have the right to realise their aspirations and discover their true potential” – David Bickers, CEO

Flying is a brilliant experience for children because it puts a huge smile on their faces. It’s also fun for the family. As one parent said: “My daughter cannot stand or walk, yet she took to the air like a bird, flying over Pembrokeshire squealing with delight. We had such a wonderful day, brilliant – Thank You!”

Young Aviator Days improve life-skills and increase confidence. They help children push their barriers and focus on what they can do, rather than on what they can’t. The whole day includes picnics, a goodie bag, a DVD, and a certificate of bravery for each child.

“As a charity we rely on the generosity of donations,” says David Bickers, CEO. “They enable us to continue offering this exciting and inspirational project to children and their families. The wonderful donation from the Axis Foundation means we can secure the day for next year already, which is fantastic. It is wonderful for the children and their families to know already that the day will go ahead. They cannot wait! All children have the right to realise their aspirations and discover their true potential.”

The Douglas Bader Foundation provides support in many ways, as well as hosting their aviator days for over 10 years. To find out more, visit www.douglasbaderfoundation.com.

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Samson centre patients using electronic standing frames with nursesDisability

The Samson Centre for MS

The Axis Foundation donates to fund the purchase of an electronic standing frame.

The Samson Centre provides practical and emotional help for people living with Multiple Sclerosis in Surrey and nearby areas. Our donation of £8000 will buy a much-needed electronic standing frame as well as a mini arm support.

This is such a special piece of equipment – Jackie Payne, Centre Manager

Electronic standing frames improve the quality of life for people with MS. Exercise is difficult because of limited balance, which means certain muscles are rarely used. This can weaken the body and cause a fear of falling. The frames help wheelchair bound people to stand on their own feet and exercise without that fear. They stimulate muscles that need it, while a mini arm support is used for people who need arm strengthening.

The frames play a vital role at the Samson Centre, because they help people to exercise and stay active. A new electronic frame lasts for 10 years and wheelchair users work with them on a daily basis. Jackie Payne, Centre Manager said, “we are so grateful to the Axis Foundation for their generous donation for the purchase of a new standing frame. This is such a special piece of equipment as it allows wheelchair users to benefit from standing while they are at the Samson Centre for MS.”

The Samson Centre for MS is a charity based in Guildford, Surrey. They provide physiotherapy sessions, exercise classes, and oxygen treatments, with access to adaptive rowing. Also, they have 3 fitness instructors, 2 rehabilitation assistants and a volunteer coach for the adaptive rowing, working on a part-time basis.

To find out more, visit www.samsoncentre.org.uk

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Riders at Scropton Riding for the Disabled with rosettes and a horseDisability

Scropton Riding for the Disabled

Scropton Riding for the Disabled to purchase a new horse with donation from the Axis Foundation.

Scropton Riding for the Disabled is dedicated to enriching people’s lives through horse riding. Our donation of £5500 will buy a new horse for the centre, to give even more support to disabled people. Scropton Riding for the Disabled is the only centre of its kind in the East Midlands.

Scropton Riding for the Disabled has changed my life – Matthew Dalley, rider at Scropton

Horse riding is an activity that vastly improves health and mental wellbeing. It helps break down barriers for disabled individuals whilst being a fun and therapeutic experience. Phoebe Burns, a rider, said she feels safe at Scropton. “It’s my favourite place to be. I feel unjudged, included, happy and I can spend time with my friends, both human and equine.”

Horses have a great impact on the lives of disabled adults and children, bringing joy to the faces of all the centre’s visitors. Matthew Dalley is another rider at the centre. He said: Scropton Riding for the Disabled has changed my life, making me the person I am today. Riding has helped me develop in so many ways and now I am both a para rider and volunteer for RDA. I am so lucky to have such fantastic support from the centre.”

Horses are Scropton’s most valuable resource. One horse provides 10,000 sessions over 10 years. A new horse will provide more riding opportunities for more disabled children and adults.

Scroton Trustee Glynis Dalley commented: “The activities we provide here at Scropton make a very real difference to the lives of people who take part. Whether our riders come for therapy or to develop riding as a sport, the benefits spread way beyond their time in the saddle. For many it can be absolutely life changing. Our fantastic horses are key to what we do, and we are very excited that the Axis Foundation is going to help us expand our team, allowing us to help even more local disabled adults and children.”

To find out more, visit www.scropton.com

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Group of Dog A.I.D service users and volunteersDisability

Dog Assistance In Disability (Dog A.I.D)

Axis Foundation supports Dog A.I.D with donation for pet training programme.

Dog A.I.D supports people with physical disabilities by offering pet training programmes to their dogs. Our donation of £6000 will help six pups gain Assistance Dog status through the pet training programme. Assistance Dog status is an international standard recognised by Assistance Dogs International (ADI). Each qualified dog can provide physical and emotional support to their owners.

This can be truly life changing. A huge thank you from all of us – Mike McDonald, Chief Executive

Assistance dogs drastically improve the quality of life for people with disabilities. They help with day-to-day tasks that most take for granted and can perform potentially life-saving interventions. Having a companion also increases confidence, resilience and independence,  vital for people with disabilities. Support from Dog A.I.D, and a lifelong furry friend even helps some return to meaningful employment.

Chief Executive, Mike McDonald, commented: “As a charity Dog A.I.D. receives no Government financial support. So we rely on the generosity of our local communities and Grant Making Trusts. We are absolutely delighted that the Axis Foundation have chosen to support our work with a fantastic £6,000 donation, as part of their 10th Anniversary celebrations. This grant will enable people throughout the UK to benefit from training their own pet dog and this can be truly life changing. A huge thank you from all of us.”

Dog A.I.D have over 100 qualified instructors based throughout the UK. There is a high demand for potential clients, so to find out more visit https://dogaid.org.uk/.

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Band Performing at Music therapy charityDisability

Otakar Kraus Music Trust

Music therapy helps many children with additional needs when nothing else can reach them.

The Axis Foundation’s donation of £8,000 to The Otakar Kraus Music Trust (OKMT) enables seven pupils to attend OK Music School.

Here qualified music therapists teach children and young people with physical, learning, mental or neurological disability or illness.

Whilst at the music therapy school, children interact and make friends, reducing isolation. They gain communication skills and become more confident. Improved listening skills and focus help their learning at school. And performing makes them feel happier, proud of their achievements and part of the community. Some children have passed Royal School of Music exams, and some have performed on national radio.

The children say:

‘It makes me feel good about myself – I can do something well!’

“I love music because it gives me confidence and it takes me away from the pressures of real life. I make more friends here than anywhere else”

Parents say:

“OK Music School has been amazing helping my daughter to gain confidence and improve her memory and listening skills. She is able to verbalise that she is proud of herself.”

“E has blossomed, she had very low self-esteem when we started as she was unable to attend school due to her severe anxieties. It has been a Godsend for her mental health.”

“We are delighted that the Axis Foundation has approved our application to enable seven pupils with disabilities to attend OK Music School for 36 weeks. This will make a huge difference to our music therapy work and allow more children to enjoy the benefits of learning and performing music”- Valerie Roy, Fundraising Manager, OKMT

Read more about this Twickenham-based charity here

OK Music School Case Study

D is 8 and is diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. He struggles with interacting with people he doesn’t know and with some motor skills. He lacks concentration and has some language and communication difficulties. Therefore it is hard for him to take part in activities where he could enjoy time and space with his peers. D had received speech and language therapy and some music therapy.

But then his mother heard about OKMT through a London Autism group.

D started attending the OKMT Youth Choir, where he was silent for a few months until he finally joined in and started singing along. Then he joined OK Music school where he began to learn to play the piano. He thrived on the stable routine, and playing piano now provides him respite and happiness. His concentration and motor skills have improved, and he is now confident in a group of children and socially more aware of others. He took part in the Christmas concert in 2019 and played Twinkle Twinkle Little Star on the piano which gave him a great sense of achievement. His family were so proud and joyful to watch him playing in the concert in front of a big audience.

D said, “I feel happy and excited to attend my music lessons!”

LOCKDOWN UPDATE from Valerie Roy, Fundraising Manager, OKMT

“During lockdown our therapists were able to adapt to provide online OK Music School lessons for over half of the Music School pupils. These worked remarkably well and provided a positive activity with a familiar face, which helped reduce anxiety and isolation and improve the pupils’ mental well-being. We also provided pre-recorded videos for younger children with disabilities, our online Youth Choir and also online music therapy groups for adults with neurological conditions, mental health problems and for elderly people.

“We have now returned to face-to-face lessons for nearly all pupils, with social distancing, masks and increased cleaning.  We will not be able to hold a Christmas concert this year (2020) but aim to record pupils at lessons performing pieces they have learned and then stream this online for parents and others as an alternative Christmas concert.”

OKMT Survey Results

OKMT recently asked parents what difference OK Music School was making to their child.  The top survey results were:

  • Increased their confidence and self-esteem 100%
  • Improved their concentration and ability to follow instructions 79%
  • Improved their mental well-being  74%
  • Improved their listening skills 68%
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